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  1. #11
    Senior Member goobie's Avatar
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    Jul 2011
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    SouthEastern WI
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    Raven, SLD Streamliner
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elionoxa View Post
    I had to use my 40 degree hammock setup on a 30 degree night and my lower body was kinda cold. Feet the coldest.

    Do I solve this with a sleeping bag liner such as Sea to Summit Reactor (lightest option) that adds up to 14 degrees in warmth?
    A liner definitely works. I've used a fleece one in deep winter (well below 0F) with good results. Nothing is more user friendly than quilts rated for the temps your in, but the longer will do until you are able to upgrade

  2. #12
    FLTurtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Orlando FL
    Hammock
    DW Chameleon, WB Eldorado
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    Thunder/Superfly
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    HG 20/40
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    DW Beetle Buckles
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    1,025
    Quote Originally Posted by Elionoxa View Post
    I had to use my 40 degree hammock setup on a 30 degree night and my lower body was kinda cold. Feet the coldest.

    Do I solve this with a sleeping bag liner such as Sea to Summit Reactor (lightest option) that adds up to 14 degrees in warmth?
    What did you have underneath you? Extra clothing can help...loose socks and thermal bottoms. I have a 40F HG Burrow and Phoenix (3/4 length underquilt). When it gets close to 40F, lower legs and feet do feel the chill. I can supplement with a sit pad or jam some extra clothes down into the footbox of my Burrow. If I had the full length Incubator, I would be fine.

    However, when I tried to push into the 30s, my back felt the chill...so in that case, I put on a fleece pullover and did ok. When I got back home, I ordered a 20F Incubator.

    Depending on your budget, I would look at that weight gain (plus the bulk) for the Reactor vs going to a lower rated quilt. Going from an 40F HG Econ Incubator to a 20F is an extra 7 oz. Plus...the Reactor is kinda like a sleeping bag, which is a pita to get into.

    Good luck!

  3. #13
    Senior Member dakotaross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Chamblee, GA
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    SuperiorGear or Dutch netless
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    custom pentagon
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    down hammock or UQ
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    Dutch Mantis
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elionoxa View Post
    I had to use my 40 degree hammock setup on a 30 degree night and my lower body was kinda cold. Feet the coldest.

    Do I solve this with a sleeping bag liner such as Sea to Summit Reactor (lightest option) that adds up to 14 degrees in warmth?
    Quote Originally Posted by Elionoxa View Post
    Hi, sorry I forgot to mention that I am not a complete noob. I am just looking for something that can help me get past that unexpected night out where the temperature can drop below my gear temp rating.

    this is when I am on offroad adventures on my motorcycle sometimes I camp on hot weather and next day I am in the mountains where its colder. 95% of the time its above 40 degrees but that 5% is not worth carrying a warmer UQ and TQ

    My setup is:
    dutch chameleom + asym bugnet
    dutch bonded hex tarp
    HG premium incubator 40 degrees
    HG premium burrow 40 degrees

    thank you
    Not a big fan of the liners, as mentioned previously they are a PITA for the very incremental warmth you might get. I think a supplemental pad is the easiest/cheapest option, but only a torso or mid-length version. All sorts of stuff you can add to contain the environment around your hammock, but none more complete and effective as a windsock. By the time you buy an UQP and perhaps grizz beak (or clip on tarp doors) you'll have spent more than a windsock will cost. And its of very little bulk compared to a pad, and about the same weight. I personally like the zippered versions (Warbonnet) which are more convenient to me, than the tube versions that are lighter.
    "I wonder if anyone else has an ear so tuned and sharpened as I have, to detect the music, not of the spheres, but of earth, subtleties of major and minor chord that the wind strikes upon the tree branches. Have you ever heard the earth breathe... ?"
    - Kate Chopin

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Valpo, IN
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    Towns-End Luxury Bridge
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    Two thoughts:
    When you're on the edge of a system's range, small things can become apparent. In this case; perhaps the simple fact that your foot end might be elevated (typically is in a gathered end) and that is causing some reduced circulation, which is causing the cold feet. You can try hanging closer to level to improve your circulation to trouble shoot. If it works but you don't love it... at least you have the alternatative to use it only when you hit that unexpected chilly night. This might be even more true for you on the motorcycle (IE not hiking).

    Before you go picking up a bunch of stuff for your hammock on the occasional cooler night... what do you have that might be good for you overall?
    A light foam pad that you also use for a sit pad for example.
    Clothing- a spare fleece top, wind breaker, vest, etc. IE... what spare clothes do you have or wish you had that can also be put on your feet. Simply putting your insulated vest over your feet might do it.

    As a bonus you can wear the clothing for non-hammock use.

    Liners, wind socks, bigger tarps, etc... all good tricks but they help you with very specific hammock problems rather than general outdoors problems.
    The lightest upgrade is always your insulation (quilts)... but the second easiest is to use something you've already got.

    I'd imagine a motorcycle rider might have a heavier jacket than your typical backpacker.

    Finally- the hot water bottle trick is a nice catch all for this issue. So long as you have a Nalgene type bottle (rated for hot/boiling water) then you're in good shape. As an added bonus this is a nice way to store your water so it doesn't freeze up and worst case you've lost a few ounces and money upgrading your water bottle.
    As a side note- those sea to summit liners never quite live up to the rating. It's basically a long underwear fabric and they run the numbers based on how that fabric performs as long underwear (Baselayer next to your body) not as a suplement to insulation. As a fancy bedsheet... it doesn't work quite as well in real life.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
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    DIY ROBIC
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    OES MacCat SilPoly
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    down bag, Klymit
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    Lots of good info here. My two cents: I have tried using a liner in the past, and hated it. It was difficult to get into (even on the ground in a tent, but especially in a hammock) and didn't add much warmth.

  6. #16
    Senior Member dakotaross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Chamblee, GA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post
    ...the hot water bottle trick is a nice catch all for this issue. So long as you have a Nalgene type bottle (rated for hot/boiling water) then you're in good shape. As an added bonus this is a nice way to store your water so it doesn't freeze up and worst case you've lost a few ounces and money upgrading your water bottle.
    Real good option here. The real issue is the bottom which you can supplement, OR make more efficient. The windsock would make more efficient by reducing convection heat loss. The hot water bottle increases your temperature AND the temperature of the insulation. The speed of heat loss is really the main point here, and when you have high next to high, the transfer rate is lower. Granted the transfer rate from the down to the outside is higher because of the greater differential, but that's where down is better than most other insulation in terms of retarding heat transfer.
    "I wonder if anyone else has an ear so tuned and sharpened as I have, to detect the music, not of the spheres, but of earth, subtleties of major and minor chord that the wind strikes upon the tree branches. Have you ever heard the earth breathe... ?"
    - Kate Chopin

  7. #17
    Senior Member DocWatson's Avatar
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    Jun 2019
    Location
    Merrimack, NH
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    131
    I use a liner to help on the colder nights.
    I also put my feet inside my puffy under the top quilt on even colder nights
    Sometimes, I'll put on two pairs of socks (make sure they are loose and not tight) and put hand warmers on the bottom of my feet between the pairs of socks
    I'll also level out the hammock in colder weather so my feet are not as elevated. That also keeps my feet warmer.
    Don't forget a warm hat, balaclava, or buff. Keep your head warm and it's easier to keep the rest of your body warm.

    - Clyde

  8. #18
    Rhody Seth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Charlestown, RI
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    Dutchware Chameleon
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    I tried a liner for several trips but gave it up as it was a supreme pain. It would always slide down on me and I've find it wrapped up around my knees. I was constantly pulling it back up and found it to be much more aggravation than it was worth.

  9. #19
    New Member
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    Jan 2023
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    Kosovo
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    Can you please explain what is “ill also level out my hammock”, what is leveling your hammock? Thanks

  10. #20
    New Member
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    Jan 2023
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    Kosovo
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    Very cool answer thanks!!

    i thought the ridgeline fixes the hammock hang, however apart or close the trees? What you said about hanging it closer now i have to ask because clearly there is something i dont know about

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