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  1. #1
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    Wool Batting Underquilt

    Hey guys,

    greetings from Germany. I am kind of fed up with petro-chemical fibres, and I am a big fan of sheeps wool. For my first DIY project I am considering wool batting/fleece as insulation.

    Mainly I am using my hammock when night fishing. If a wool insulated underquilt will be heavier and bulkier than normal, I am ok with that. I dont intend to hike with it. As a matter of fact, I pretty much never go hiking.


    I was wondering if there is anyone here that has the same passion for wool, and has had experience with using it for underquilt insulation.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    I’m interested as well.

    I have no experience with wool as an underquilt, but have used wool as top quilt on the ground, and use an Icelandic wool sweater (jumper) rather than a puffy for in camp outer layer. The Icelandic sweater is competitive against fleece warmth vs weight. For hammocking, my idea has been to target a 40-50 degree set of wool quilts and rely on down for anything colder (for compressibility as well as weight since I hike).

    For hiking, Wool type matters, modern trends emphasize smooth feel (e. g. Merino) vs itchy but warmer per weight (eg Lopi). In batting form you may not have any control over wool type (and may not care), but for hikers it matters. For hiking, I use it mostly in knitted or crocheted form, I can control the type, weight and loft (warmth) better. As a summer weight crocheted under quilt, I think I could get around a pound and maybe 40-50 deg equivalent made of Lopi or similar (the itchy stiff guard hairs give it better loft per weight than silky merino). Maybe less weight for a partial length quilt emulating a Yeti, or maybe the one pound target is a partial length under quilt, not sure. I’m not looking at alpaca, yak, cashmere wools at this time, mostly just sheep’s wool.

  3. #3

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    Baaaad aaaaass thread since I wear wool articles of clothing somewhere on my body year-round. Might have to learn to crochet.
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  4. #4
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    Let me expand a bit on what I found out so far.

    Correct, there are very different wool types with different properties. Most commonly known is Merino. Merino sheep breed has been introduced due to smoothness of its wool fabrics. People in general avcoid itchy wool fabrics. Some sheep wool has better loft qualities than others. The denser and finer the hair, the better it traps heat. Sheep from more rainy parts of the world usually have thicker hair (in diameter), than sheep from areas with warmer climate. Most of the wool from Europe is therefore pretty itchy.

    In general wool fibre loft traps heat longer, or releases the heat in a way that is more comfortable for the human body, compared to artificial fibres, On the other hand artificial fibres are better for a quick heat build up.

    Wool felts can completely block wind penetration. For hammocking that alone should definately be a reason worth exploring the subject.
    Last edited by Yannick; 10-03-2022 at 18:36.

  5. #5
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    I have used a wool blanket inside my hammock more than once to lay on when my UQ has not been enough. I have also used it inside my UQ for added warmth. Never tried it as just an UQ but when I have used it, it has been a real warmth saver.

    I use the US Army (VietNam Era) wool blankets. I got 6 of them a number of years ago for 5.00 each. They had a couple of worn spots and holes in them but nothing that I could not repair and use.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkurfiss View Post
    I have used a wool blanket inside my hammock more than once to lay on when my UQ has not been enough. I have also used it inside my UQ for added warmth. Never tried it as just an UQ but when I have used it, it has been a real warmth saver.

    I use the US Army (VietNam Era) wool blankets. I got 6 of them a number of years ago for 5.00 each. They had a couple of worn spots and holes in them but nothing that I could not repair and use.
    The US-Military wool blankets are pretty thin from what I know. You might want to consider testing thicker wool fabrics when camping, or just stack them. If you like "the wool", as a gudeline I would recommend 800-1400 gr/squaremeter as a rule of thumb (please convert, I have tried times and times again)

    I have simply attached a wool blanket underneath my hammock as a test. As long as the fabric firmly connects to your body, it works fine. Sure, if there is a cold breeze, its not gonna do much, as it is just a blanket thats not intended to be used in windy outdoor conditions.

    Anyway, I want to come up with some wind breaking wool underquilt properties by using felts. I dont even know if "felt" is the correct english word for what I mean. The very thick carpet like wool material is what I mean. Its heavy, but its gonna do the job.

  7. #7
    hutzelbein's Avatar
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    Extremtextil has been offering woolen insulation for a while. Grüezi Bag even offers a ready-made underquilt with it. And a German Haengemattenforum member has insulated his 90° hammock with Lavalan - apparently with good success.

    However, if you are using a woolen blanket, I would put it inside the hammock. I think it will provide more warmth that way.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the links. Lavalan looks interesting. They recommend using down proof fabrics for quilting. I dont see benefits to ordinary woolen fleece in that case, apart from loft properties that might be more stable and light weight
    Last edited by Yannick; 10-04-2022 at 09:08.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Otter1's Avatar
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    Since weight & bulk aren't a concern, It'll work ... with a big IF. IF you use heavy enough shock cord to suspend the UQ, and you have it shaped properly so that you maintain contact with the hammock for the full length of the UQ.

    A warm one will be a big one, for sure. Please post your results.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Otter1 View Post
    Since weight & bulk aren't a concern, It'll work ... with a big IF. IF you use heavy enough shock cord to suspend the UQ, and you have it shaped properly so that you maintain contact with the hammock for the full length of the UQ.

    A warm one will be a big one, for sure. Please post your results.
    Hey Otter.

    well, thats why I want to go for a wooki type UQ-concept, where a second hammock is pressing the insulation perfectly against the body.

    I am not sure how heavy and bulky its gonna get.

    In the end I might have to buy one of those indistrial big bags used in construction and farming for transportation big bag.jpg

    I will keep you posted and publish results here.

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