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  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Berlin, VT
    Hammock
    WBBB
    Tarp
    WB minifly
    Insulation
    Yeti
    Suspension
    buckles
    Posts
    313
    Shug has great hammock-specific info. Checkout Darwin's (Darwin on the Trail) YouTube channel for bikepacking info.

  2. #12
    cmoulder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Ossining, NY
    Hammock
    DH Darien, SLD Tree Runner
    Tarp
    HG hex
    Insulation
    Timmermade, Revolt
    Suspension
    Kevlar, Lapp Hitch
    Posts
    4,865
    Images
    356
    I forgot about Darwin... excellent suggestion. Good one here, which is fairly recent.

    Five Basic Principles of Going Lighter (not me... the great Cam Honan of OZ)
    “If everybody is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking.” ~ Gen. George S Patton

  3. #13
    FLTurtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Orlando FL
    Hammock
    DW Chameleon, WB Eldorado
    Tarp
    Thunder/Superfly
    Insulation
    HG 20/40
    Suspension
    DW Beetle Buckles
    Posts
    1,025
    Quote Originally Posted by Salt View Post
    Insulation wise, I just acquired a UGQ 20F Bandit TQ and am starting to eye UQs... With a fair bit of sewing experience, this is a tempting project. However, the modular SLD Trail Winder is pretty appealing if I decide on non-down. Given the normal temperature ranges I'm exposed to, I think a 30 or 40F would pair well with the TQ. Thinking that the extra bulk/weight of a UQP would make sense for nasty weather and to increase the temperature range a bit. Along a similar vein, a sock seems like overkill but am interested in them for next Winter. Thoughts?
    If you're looking at down underquilts, Hammock Gear is having a 15% off sale. If you're planning on using the 20F TQ, I would at least match the rating for the UQ, or like some folks do: have a lower temp rated UQ. It's easier to insulate the top with more clothes, but anything underneath you will get compressed and lose some insulation value.

    I'm not entirely sold on a UPQ providing more insulation value...but I can see how it would help in windy conditions where the UQ is exposed to the wind and gusts blowing out the built up warmth. You mentioned that you have a WB Superfly tarp. If you pitch it low, that should do a pretty good job of blocking the wind.

    If you were using something skimpier, an UQP would make more sense. IMO, I'd rather have more tarp than having another piece of gear to help out a lesser tarp. Looking at the HG UQP, they weigh in around 6-7 oz. Adding an UQP is more weight and bulk, so why not just size up the tarp?

  4. #14
    cougarmeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Hammock
    WBBB, WBRR, WL LiteOwl
    Tarp
    OES, WL BullFro
    Insulation
    HG UQ, TQ, WB UQ
    Suspension
    Python Straps
    Posts
    3,506
    Nothing for nothing, but “… I can see how it would help in windy conditions where the UQ is exposed to the wind and gusts blowing out the built up warmth." that’s what “insulation value” is. I’m not talking about the R rating. I’m talking about the value of the UQP in keeping you warmer.

    Let’s say you have a tarp without doors; they’re out there. If the wind shift - and it does - it might come right in parallel to your tarp. it’s happened. If you are alone and setting up your UQ. you can’t see how well it fits and be in the hammock at the same time. The UQP, makes that setup a little less critical. But hopefully you got that all sorted out at home before the trip.

    If the ground is wet and you are taking down your hammock, and the slippery suspension (whoopie sling) slides out of your cold frozen hand, the UQP will keep the UQ cleaner. If you need an handy temporary pocket to drop something, like light clothing in, the UQP is there.

    But yes, if you have a SuperFly with doors, and rig it low to the ground with doors shut, you’ll be as snug as a bug in a tarp.

    The sock is sort of in the same area - a beefed up UQP for winter. And it also has decreased value if you have one of those house-o-nylon (or silpoly) that A SuperFly, Winter Palace, etc. provides.

    I love a big tarp for bad weather. And even if I know I’m going to have very little probability of rain, I still more some protection overhead - more things fall from the sky besides rain. And I still want wind-shift protection. So a small fly and a UQP are a great combo for that. In another post today, someone mentioned their comfort in Washington rain - which is spelled RAIN - with just a MiniFly and UQP. I asked him to comment more on how dry he was with the MiniFly.

    Again, if I knew there was a real chance of rain, I’d use a larger tarp. Because I like a dry area besides just the hammock itself. But in the summer, the view and ventilation you get from a MiniFly/UQP is great.
    Last edited by cougarmeat; 03-02-2022 at 19:12.
    In order to see what few have seen, you must go where few have gone. And DO what few have done.

  5. #15
    Senior Member rmcrow2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2021
    Location
    US
    Hammock
    El Dorado
    Tarp
    Varies
    Insulation
    UQ varies
    Suspension
    Whoopie
    Posts
    313
    I am bikepacking the CT and doing a 1000 mile self supported this year.

    For long term living on the bike you want to pick your bike, then gear, then bags.
    I don't want to fiddle at the end of a day.

    Kit that is simple, adjustable but stays adjusted.
    Bags that put bulk and weight out of trouble.
    As little to loose or break as possible.

    Be happy to chew over specific mistakes I have made in different areas. A bit rushed now.

    我宁愿在山上。

  6. #16
    jakev383's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Location
    Henderson, TX
    Hammock
    Blackbird XLC
    Tarp
    11' WB Superfly
    Insulation
    SLD Trail Winder
    Suspension
    Beckett and EVOs
    Posts
    111
    Quote Originally Posted by FLTurtle View Post
    You mentioned that you have a WB Superfly tarp. If you pitch it low, that should do a pretty good job of blocking the wind.
    Quote Originally Posted by cougarmeat View Post

    But yes, if you have a SuperFly with doors, and rig it low to the ground with doors shut, you’ll be as snug as a bug in a tarp.
    I'm the one who mentioned I had the SuperFly - the OP has a 10' (mostly square) Amazon tarp at the moment.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Ldog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Hammock
    DutchWare Half-Zipped (Hexon 1.0)
    Tarp
    HammockGear CF Hex
    Insulation
    HG UQs and TQs
    Suspension
    Huggers w/Whoopies
    Posts
    112
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Salt View Post
    Hi All, I've been itching to upgrade my daily driver hammock for some time, finally leading me to joining the forum and now buying a TQ. Guess it is time to start that shopping list...
    Been honing my kit since I started hiking the AT in 2012. Did it in 5 sections over 4 years, Hiked 100 miles of the NCT thru Michigans Upper Peninsula, and will finish the last 70 miles of Vermont's Long Trail this summer. Been using the principles of UL/Lightweight backpacking the whole time, tempered by the realities of long-distance backpacking, vs weekend jaunts. I also had lots of time to reevaluate each and every item multiple times. I use the same stuff for bikepacking.

    Having said all that, most of this stuff is quite old, but works. The lighterpack link leads to a free site that lets one build a database of the gear they own (or want), and to build packing lists for different trips. And to share it with others so they can evaluate it. It's free, and a good idea to use something like it to help evaluate what you got, or what you may want to buy. The LaughingDog link leads to a blog I started that went thru my deep dive into lighter backpacking.

    I will say this. Most experienced long distance backpackers don't carry ANY superfluous stuff. The only "extra" clothes in my pack are a couple pair each of socks and underwear. I carry a light base layer to sleep in, a puffy and a rain shield. My pack is heavy by some standards. But it's what I need for shoulder season hiking in the east coast mountains.

    Be aware that "ultralight" packs are designed for people who have their total pack weight way down. They achieve their weight, in part, by using little to no suspension. Carrying a load above their specified weight limits is a miserable experience. The pack on my list is such a pack, and I tend to push it's designed load specs. But I've learned how to pack my gear so as to transfer the weight from my shoulders to my hips.
    As for my "Shelter," I carry Dutch's 11' Half-Zip Hammock (Hexon 1.0) w/ 8" cont. loops & fixed ridgeline. I use whoopies larks headed to tree straps. My tarp is a HammockGear DCF Hex. My sleep system is HammockGear quilts and UQP, an Exped Air Pillow UL M, and I carry a Nemo Tensor Sleeping Pad - Short For when I want to stay in a trail shelter, a hostel, or otherwise go to ground.
    I'll be following this thread to see if there are new, lighter options I want to explore. And I'll certainly look at what you are. But I'll probably be hiking this summer with what's on this list ...

    L Dog


    https://lighterpack.com/r/38fgjt
    www.laughingdog.com
    Last edited by Ldog; 03-07-2022 at 10:17.
    L.Dog
    AT 2000 Miler/ 1752 Hangin' Miles
    Pictures
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  8. #18
    cmoulder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Ossining, NY
    Hammock
    DH Darien, SLD Tree Runner
    Tarp
    HG hex
    Insulation
    Timmermade, Revolt
    Suspension
    Kevlar, Lapp Hitch
    Posts
    4,865
    Images
    356
    Quote Originally Posted by Ldog View Post
    Been honing my kit since I started hiking the AT in 2012. Did it in 5 sections over 4 years, Hiked 100 miles of the NCT thru Michigans Upper Peninsula, and will finish the last 70 miles of Vermont's Long Trail this summer. Been using the principles of UL/Lightweight backpacking the whole time, tempered by the realities of long-distance backpacking, vs weekend jaunts. I also had lots of time to reevaluate each and every item multiple times. I use the same stuff for bikepacking.

    Having said all that, most of this stuff is quite old, but works. The lighterpack link leads to a free site that lets one build a database of the gear they own (or want), and to build packing lists for different trips. And to share it with others so they can evaluate it. It's free, and a good idea to use something like it to help evaluate what you got, or what you may want to buy. The LaughingDog link leads to a blog I started that went thru my deep dive into lighter backpacking.

    I will say this. Most experienced long distance backpackers don't carry ANY superfluous stuff. The only "extra" clothes in my pack are a couple pair each of socks and underwear. I carry a light base layer to sleep in, a puffy and a rain shield. My pack is heavy by some standards. But it's what I need for shoulder season hiking in the east coast mountains.

    Be aware that "ultralight" packs are designed for people who have their total pack weight way down. They achieve their weight, in part, by using little to no suspension. Carrying a load above their specified weight limits is a miserable experience. The pack on my list is such a pack, and I tend to push it's designed load specs. But I've learned how to pack my gear so as to transfer the weight from my shoulders to my hips.
    As for my "Shelter," I carry Dutch's 11' Half-Zip Hammock (Hexon 1.0) w/ 8" cont. loops & fixed ridgeline. I use whoopies larks headed to tree straps. My tarp is a HammockGear DCF Hex. My sleep system is HammockGear quilts and UQP, an Exped Air Pillow UL M, and I carry a Nemo Tensor Sleeping Pad - Short For when I want to stay in a trail shelter, a hostel, or otherwise go to ground.
    I'll be following this thread to see if there are new, lighter options I want to explore. And I'll certainly look at what you are. But I'll probably be hiking this summer with what's on this list ...

    L Dog


    https://lighterpack.com/r/38fgjt
    www.laughingdog.com
    I'm pretty sure I've said this before, but your gear list and your excellent explanations of the rationale behind all your selections is one of the best 'out there' ... a complete list that doesn't skip or 'hide' anything. Great for beginners learning about real- world UL, not some ohhh-wow super low number trying to impress anyone.

    Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
    Five Basic Principles of Going Lighter (not me... the great Cam Honan of OZ)
    “If everybody is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking.” ~ Gen. George S Patton

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