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  1. #1
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    New (?) 90 degree hammock design

    Hi! I haven't been on the forum in a while - I have been busy. I have developed what I believe to be a new 90 degree hammock design. It uses two connected short gathered end hammocks, one regular one and one that uses shaped sides to create a bit of a raised “shelf” for the legs.



    This hammock is, first and foremost, about comfort. I find it comfortable in a way that eliminates some of the problems I have with GE hammocks.

    The hammock doesn't provide a very flat lay, but puts you in the very comfortable “zero gravity” position currently promoted by many bed/mattress companies – kind of like a reclined La-Z-Boy. It also provides for various side sleeping positions. If you are a sprawler like my wife, this is as good or better than a regular GE hammock.

    The main hammock for the head and torso is an 8 foot long GE hammock with straight sides and a short (approximately 5 foot) ridgeline. One side of this hammock is connected to a shorter GE hammock with shaped sides, like so:

    Foot hammock outline.png

    What this does is sort of like taking the “calf ridge” present in normal, diagonal-lay GE hammocks and placing it perpendicularly under the knees. The shape of the leg hammock also lowers the lower legs so that they are basically horizontal or, depending on the shaping of the sides of the leg hammock, placed with the feet slightly above or below the knees.

    The leg hammock is attached with 1/2” webbing and ladder locks, so the height relative to the body hammock can be adjusted higher or lower. You could also use whoopie slings instead of webbing and ladder locks, although they are less easy to adjust.

    Since there are two hammocks sewn together, and you lay across that seam, you could reasonably think this would be uncomfortable. In practice, we find that the seam isn’t that noticeable, since the seam is under the thighs, and the thighs are positioned so that they are not putting a lot of pressure on the hammock. I suppose if you slept in the hammock in very short shorts so that your naked skin is in contact with the seam some people might find it uncomfortable. I don’t wear short shorts, but it doesn’t bother my wife.

    Pros (some pros presumably apply to all 90 degree hammocks):

    1. Comfort – very good back support and leg support.
    2. No bridge hammock shoulder squeeze.
    3. No GE hammock calf ridge.
    4. No leg/knee hyperextension.
    5. You only need a little more than 5 feet between trees.
    6. You can sprawl in many positions like in a GE hammock.
    7. Side sleeping, especially in a pseudo-fetal position, is also quite comfortable.
    8. The forward/backward rocking is very soothing, and (for some reason) seems to go on for a long time if you allow it to. (10 minutes plus, depending on hang & other factors.)
    9. It requires less skill to set up than GE or bridge hammocks. As long as you get it (mostly) level side to side, you’re good. If you are anal like me, a cheap plastic line level on the ridgeline will make you happy.
    10. The best view doesn’t require craning your neck to see it - no tree directly in your line of site.
    11. Since the ridgeline is so short, you can make a tarp that fits without needing a seam in the ridge.
    12. No end poles like a bridge hammock.
    13. No inflatable pad needed for structural support like a Drawmer.
    14. A little over half a pound, without making any effort to lighten it. (1.1 oz ripstop body hammock, 1.3 oz ripstop leg hammock, width/hammock lengths sized for maximum comfort)
    15. Construction is a little more work than sewing a couple of regular GE hammocks.


    Cons (some cons presumably apply to all 90 degree hammocks)

    1. I think that a bug net attached to the sides of the hammock, as many camping hammocks do, would be difficult. A wraparound net or a partial net hung from the ridgeline work fine.
    2. In order to keep all of your leg in contact with an underquilt, you have to have at least one attachment point under the knees pulling up in addition to attachment points at the head and foot.
    3. In practice, you will probably want more attachment points for the underquilt to keep it from sagging and hitting the ground when you aren’t in the hammock, because the hammock “collapses” when you aren’t in it.
    4. A tarp that fits well will probably need doors on the side to be effective against wind or wind-driven rain, because the peaked ends are very near the hammock.
    5. If you have a long distance between trees you will have to get the straps/ropes higher than with a longer hammock.
    6. If you have REALLY sensitive foot soles and are in the hammock without any sleeping bag or blanket wrapping around your feet, you could find the small amount of pressure on your feet uncomfortable. (I hurt the ball of my foot last fall and it was slow to heal, so I designed the foot contact area to put pressure primarily on the heel of the foot.)
    7. If you prefer an inflatable pad to an underquilt, it will require some creativity to do a double layer hammock for the purpose of putting a pad between the layers.


    I don't yet know what I want to do with this design, although I definitely want to share the comfort. I probably need some experienced hangers to give me some feedback to start. Anybody near Portland want to try it out?

  2. #2
    Senior Member rmcrow2's Avatar
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    Nifty idea.
    I want two now.

    Thank you for sharing

    Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    OlTrailDog's Avatar
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    Early this spring I made several hammocks similar to this design. Albeit there are also some substantial differences between your model and the prototypes I made. Although the theory behind my design works, it needed some alterations before I considered it to be prime time ready. So I ordered the materials for the next iterations. However, summer has come on strong and I needed to focus on outdoor projects while the weather is conducive to getting them accomplished. Consequently, I needed to lay the hammock development aside until this fall. Suffice it to say that I think you are on the right track. Not there yet, but headed in a great direction.

    My affection for the comfort afforded in a 90* has also lead to a couple of other designs that I have sent off to a vendor for evaluation, and a second that I am also waiting on the long months of winter to tackle. Needless to say I applaud your efforts.

  4. #4
    Senior Member WV's Avatar
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    Good work!

    It's great to see various versions of this idea cropping up again, and the new ones look excellent. Here's a thread on the same theme: https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/...=angle+hammock

  5. #5
    Senior Member WV's Avatar
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    Here's a photo of my 2012 right angle hammock. It used clews for the torso and leg sections, with spreader bars at the suspension attachment points to keep the hammock from collapsing when unoccupied. I like the simplicity of pdxhanger's design. I may go back to the right angle design because recently my left shoulder has decided it doesn't like being squeezed in a bridge hammock.
    https://www.hammockforums.net/galler...hp?i=17328&c=4

  6. #6
    Herder of Cats OutandBack's Avatar
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    It is always fun to see someone doing something different with their hammock hobby. Great job pdxhanger

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    really interesting


    the part that really intrigued me, is that it really really looks like an Amok Draumr, but without the pad pocket.

    really like what you've done here, especially with the underquilt adaption too

  8. #8
    Senior Member hutzelbein's Avatar
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    Haven't seen this design, yet. I like the looks of it

  9. #9
    OlTrailDog's Avatar
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    Since it isn't fact unless there is a pic I took a video of the hammock, my first foray into hammock sewing, today and clipped a frame. This was my first prototype I made back in February, 2021. Also in the picture is one of the $5 hammock frames with a Cloud71 that I currently have as my couch and alternate sleeper. The frame the prototype is hanging from usually has my Hammocktent90 alpha attached that I can lift up out of the way for day time or lower for night time use.

    Besides I as much as I talk about the cogitations and modifications I do with my experimental 90 that perhaps it is time for a little put up or shut up. There is a lot more to this hammock and final product than meets the eye....tease
    prototype1Hammock90degree-f000875.jpg

  10. #10
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    Thanks for posting this. I've done something similar with a single extra-wide piece of fabric and creative binding of the ends. With the right wrinkles, it creates a kind of hammock-chair effect. Its interesting for lounging at home but i don't think its thought out well enough for backpacking yet.

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