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  1. #1
    New Member
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    Pushing summer gear into colder temperatures

    I'm planning for a potential winter trip in the Northeast and hoping to rely mostly on my summer setup. Here's what I currently have:

    Dream Darien
    Hammock Gear Econ Phoenix 40*
    Hammock Gear Econ Burrow 40*
    Hammock Gear DCF Hex Tarp with doors

    Does anyone have tips for pushing this gear into the 30s? My main goal is to minimize additional purchases. A secondary goal is to keep my pack weight low, though I realize that's less practical in colder temps. Any tips would be appreciated.


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  2. #2
    all secure in sector 7 Shug's Avatar
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    Make certain that you (your body, feet, hands and head) are warm before crawling in the hammock.
    Your 40ļ gear will be pushed by those temps.
    Consider throwing in a pad.
    Also add a jacket or such over your footbox of the hammock since it is a partial UQ.
    See jacket over TQ or footbox in video below at 7:40 in
    Shug





    Last edited by Shug; 11-22-2020 at 22:20.
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  3. #3
    Moderator TallPaul's Avatar
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    Get a thermometer if you donít have one already and do some easy local trips to see what your tolerance level is with your current setup. You can try your minimal gear while carrying some extra stuff in case you get cold.

    My +5* kit includes hand warmers, puffy coat (often put this by my feet inside my quilt), under quilt protector (to stop the wind from robbing me of warmth) and a Nalgene for the hot water bottle trick. And of course gloves, hat, long johns as needed.

  4. #4
    cougarmeat's Avatar
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    If you have a layer of something else - some fabric - you can gather the ends and hang it under and close to your UQ like an under quilt protector (UQP) - that will add some heat retention. You donít mention if youíd be in snow or just in cold. If in snow, you can use a shovel (and a snow saw if you have one) to build walls to block the wind. Youíll want to pitch your tarp as close as comfortable but note that condensation will be a challenge. Note that is more a nuisance than a problem unless you are going out for more than a couple of days.

    Be sure to have a balaclava or some other head gear for sleeping. Hand warmer packets are good - if they work and donít leak.
    In order to see what few have seen, you must go where few have gone. And DO what few have done.

  5. #5
    New Member
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    Thanks as always Shug for the great tips. I hadn't thought of using my down coat on the outside of my hammock.

    I'll look into UQP options, that seems like a good solution as well.

    Not sure if there will be snow, but that's a distinct possibility in this area.

    I also appreciate the reminder to try out the setup beforehand. I did that some when I was first started out, but it's been a while since I did a test night in my yard!

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  6. #6

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    Don't get hot and sweaty before turning in. A lot of staying warm at night is related to temperature and moisture management during the day.

    You can extend the temp range of your sleep system by wearing clothes to bed, the caveat being I wouldn't suggest wearing damp, sweaty or dirty clothes to bed unless you absolutely have to. For example, quickly changing into dry thermal underwear and then adding your insulation layer (sweater, puffy jacket) etc. Another trick is to heat some water before bed, add it to a thermally safe container, putting that container into a baggie and adding it to the foot box. I suppose wrapping your kit with one of those SOL bivvy blankets wouldn't hurt either.

    Not my idea but a couple of people here add down pants & sweater to their sleep system. Uniqlo, believe it or not, has some inexpensive down vests and sweaters.

  7. #7

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    Costco down blankets are a cheap and easy way to add booster strength to your quilts. They are also nice around the house when you are not camping.

  8. #8
    Senior Member sidneyhornblower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by unwordedly View Post
    Does anyone have tips for pushing this gear into the 30s? My main goal is to minimize additional purchases. A secondary goal is to keep my pack weight low...
    1) I've become a fan of Mountain Laurel Designs and their EVA pads and use the 1/8 inch version to boost my gear. They also offer a 1/4 inch version. Both are relatively inexpensive:
    https://mountainlaureldesigns.com/pr...-1-8-foam-pad/
    https://mountainlaureldesigns.com/product/1-4-foam-pad/

    2) An underquilt protector helps your underquilt hold in heat in windy conditions for minimal weight. Make your own or buy from several vendors like 2QZQ and Hammockgear.

    3) If you have a cheap fleece throw and a sewing machine (or someone who can sew it for you) it's a few minutes' job to sew a footbox and make an inner liner for your top quilt. Weight for the fleece throws, however, may not be as light as something like a down throw.

    4) A poncho liner also makes a versatile, though somewhat heavy, piece of gear. It can be wrapped around your entire set-up pod style, or used to boost either the underquilt or top quilt. Pros: the price. Cons: weight and bulk

    5) Hot hands or other chemical warmers. These are a staple of my cold trips.

    6) Down or synthetic booties. Warm feet make a heck of a difference for me and I love, love, love my DIY insulated booties. Several vendors offer down versions which can be pricey. You can find synthetic ones for less or make your own, which is the cheapest option.

  9. #9
    Senior Member kattdogg's Avatar
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    Before I invested in colder gear I used to use a liner, I had a left over queen fleece fitted sheet that I sewed half way up and crawled into that and then pulled my quilts up... Only gave me just a little more but I sleep frozen so for me to notice it could mean it is a lot more for someone else.
    To only step where others have stepped means not to have your own adventures. Live, Love, and Adventure so you may leave your own foot prints!

  10. #10
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
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    I personally gave up on trying to use inadequate quilts and supplement them with clothing. Nowadays, I make sure my quilts are rated at least 10 degrees warmer than the expected low. Sometimes even that's not enough. One night I went camping with an expected low of 18* F. However, by 6 pm it was 13* F, and later got down to -3* F.

    I thought about trying my 20* quilts for that 18* F night, but decided to go with my 0* quilts, and I stacked them with my 40* quilts. I was, thankfully, toasty warm.
    "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds." Ralph Waldo Emerson

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