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  1. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
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    57
    I would have freaked out when this happened and assumed the worst. I am glad it did not damage your tarp.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #12
    FLTurtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Orlando FL
    Hammock
    DW Chameleon, WB Eldorado
    Tarp
    Thunder/Superfly
    Insulation
    HG 20/40
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    DW Beetle Buckles
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    1,023
    Quote Originally Posted by TallPaul View Post
    Im guessing it was too tight. What if the trees themselves move in opposite directions? If there is no give in the line, something else will give.
    Bingo. Even if it was just one tree moving, it's the force of the tree movement not the wind that is being applied to the tarp ridgeline.

  3. #13
    cougarmeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Hammock
    WBBB, WBRR, WL LiteOwl
    Tarp
    OES, WL BullFro
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    HG UQ, TQ, WB UQ
    Suspension
    Python Straps
    Posts
    3,506
    During my last camping trip, we had pretty good winds. I set the tarp up broadside - supposedly for best weather protection. The result was that the wind gusts would occasionally blow the side of the tarp into the hammock. Not so bad if that was all, but the gust would also dump accumulated water from the tarp on to my shoes at the edge of my hammock.

    The next day I re-oriented the tarp parallel to the wind. The ends give a smaller surface area, the suspension trees added blockage, and given the aerodynamics, the wind moving across the tarp (rather than into) give lift to pull the sides up/out instead of pushing them in.

    The only way I’ve been successful in setting up a large tarp (like SuperFly or JRB Universal) in the wind is when I’ve used snake skins. That allowed me to set the ridgeline, without fighting a sail, and guy out the sides with a little exposure at a time. Now all my tarps are going in snake skins.

    Another change I made is my suspension. I used to use a continuous ridgeline style where one side of the oval was the suspension line and the other was the tarp itself. So the connection was tarp/around the tree/down the ridgeline/around the other tree/back to the tarp. That meant the tarp itself would be absorbing any stress on the ridgeline.

    Now I’m using Dutch Hook, Nama Claws, Dutch wasp. I really like that the ridgeline takes and stress to that line (moving trees, something falling on it) and the tarp hangs under in on Nama Claws (sort of how a hammock hangs under it’s continuous ridgeline). I don’t like the fussing it takes to slide that wasp along the line but I’m learning that the wasp could live very near the Nama Claw at its end. That would make a V coming off the tree but that’s fine as the single length snakeskin slides off the tarp on the DutchHook end.
    In order to see what few have seen, you must go where few have gone. And DO what few have done.

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Hammock
    11' Dutch Netless
    Tarp
    SuperFly, others
    Insulation
    AHE KAQ/ENO
    Suspension
    Cinch,Whoopie,Atla
    Posts
    176
    Happened to me too on the 13er. Id rather the ring break than the tarp rip. Thanks for reminding me to get a new split ring!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #15
    New Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    New Concord, KY
    Posts
    5
    I recently re watched Shug's tarp setup videos where he described setting up a tarp with the side toward the wind and suggested not setting it up with the doors toward the wind, there is something I'm not understanding, (noob).

  6. #16
    all secure in sector 7 Shug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Minnesota
    Hammock
    I have many so....
    Tarp
    Blackcrow DIY Tarp
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    FrankenquiltUQ/Pod
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yucatan Dan View Post
    I recently re watched Shug's tarp setup videos where he described setting up a tarp with the side toward the wind and suggested not setting it up with the doors toward the wind, there is something I'm not understanding, (noob).
    That is not set in stone no matter what I may have said. Often I go sideways if it seems logical with the set-up and maybe only option. Side tie outs (panel pulls) really help. Sometimes I go head side door into wind and leave the foot end more or less open. Kinda depends on the tree placements and such and such.
    Shug the Ever-changing
    ShugArt Hammock Paintings....https://www.etsy.com/shop/ShugArtStu...platform-mcnav

    Whooooo Buddy)))) All Secure in Sector Seven

  7. #17
    New Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    New Concord, KY
    Posts
    5
    Thank you Shug! You mentioned that readjusting a tarp frequently is common because conditions change which is why I got some easily adjustable hardware from Dutch. I'm just trying to wrap my head around all this stuff.

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    old dirt
    Posts
    386
    hi, and welcome to the forum

    what you describe sounds quite unsuprising. i guess warbonnet is supplying those keyring s out of sheer desperation with us .

    i guess there's multiple ways to use these stingerz, but they are designed to be used such that they provide mechanical advantage (so 'as tight as i could' is turned into 'that multiplied by something'). but that might even not make much of a difference, to be honest, because materials like dyneema are force multipliers in themselves, when used like this, and provide multiplication way beyond any nifty hardware. i described on this forum a while ago how i pulled a brick out of a wall, by hand, just while "innocently" testing a ucr i was experimenting with removing slippage for (the experiment to remove slippage was a spectacular success, the fact i had to brush up my masonry skills to fix the damage was, ahem, just a nice bonus).

    if you want to use dyneema for the ridgeline, the ridgeline should be quite slack, until you stake out the corners of the tarp. with stretchy materials (like nylon thin rope) it's a bit less critical, but the angle of the ridgeline from tree to tarp should still be as close to 30 as possible (so should follow the hammock suspension basically, instead of crossing it)

    i think the "fuse" did its job, and warbonet should be commended for being so patient with us kids (we do like to crank on those ridgelines way too much)

    edit: to avoid confusion, especially seeing as the thread starter is new to the forums: what i describe above is based on basic well known physics, confirmed by empirical data (your mishap being just one example), and is universally accepted as being correct, ahem, by me alone as far as i know (so administer grain of salt, and keep the salt truck on standby)
    Last edited by nanok; 11-27-2022 at 15:11.

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