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  1. #1
    Member kroot's Avatar
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    Backpacking in Hawaii's Haleakala National Park - is it hammockable?

    I'm going down to Hawaii next February and will be doing a quick overnight trip in Haleakala National Park. I'll be staying at Palikū campground and can't tell if there's enough trees to make hammocking possible. Has anyone been out there? If so, what did you think of the trees and their potential for hammocks?

    Thank you!

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    kamileon's Avatar
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    Backpacking in Hawaii's Haleakala National Park - is it hammockable?

    Ive heard off and been to Paliku cabin, I dont remember a Paliku campground. But either way there are plenty of decent trees to hand from in that area. Not so much at the top of the summit though, its all rocks. I dont travel any where in Hawaii without my hammock and tree straps. There are always good spots to hang.


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  3. #3
    Member kroot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamileon View Post
    Ive heard off and been to Paliku cabin, I dont remember a Paliku campground. But either way there are plenty of decent trees to hand from in that area. Not so much at the top of the summit though, its all rocks. I dont travel any where in Hawaii without my hammock and tree straps. There are always good spots to hang.
    Thanks for the information! As I understand it, the campground is at the same place as the cabin. I'm not sure if there are official campsites or not, but I do know you can stay there. I'm a bit nervous about taking my hammock and being unable to find anywhere to hang, especially since I know it gets quite cold at night down there.

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    kamileon's Avatar
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    If you plan to hang by the cabin you will be fine. There are plenty of trees to hang from. If I remember correctly the temps at night range from 30-50F. So if you have a uq and tq you will be fine.
    "I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be." Douglas Adams

  5. #5
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    Haleakala National Park official site with information

    Aloha,

    I had the privilege of spending 3 nights in the crater a few years ago. This reply might be too late for the original poster, but may help others seeking information on camping/hiking in Haleakalā.

    There are 3 designated campgrounds, each with a cabin (advanced reservation and payment required) and ample room for tents (free).
    Tent camping: reservations are not necessary but permits are required. Pick one up at park headquarters on your way up to the summit.
    Attaching anything to trees or structures is strictly prohibited.

    Average night temperature is 30 degrees F, but can vary and change extremely quickly.
    Be aware that on days with bad weather, the park can be closed and youʻll be turned around.
    For example, the park was recently closed due to snow at the summit.

    Check weather conditions here: https://www.nps.gov/hale/planyourvisit/weather.htm

    For official camping information: https://www.nps.gov/hale/planyourvis...ss-camping.htm

    Local and federal government information on many trails and campgrounds throughout Hawaiʻi can be found online. Please refer to them not only for technical and practical info, but for cultural notes. Many of these areas are considered sacred, and contain cultural artifacts. Visiting requires a heightened level of awareness, caution and respect.

    Mahalo nui!


    Quote Originally Posted by kroot View Post
    Thanks for the information! As I understand it, the campground is at the same place as the cabin. I'm not sure if there are official campsites or not, but I do know you can stay there. I'm a bit nervous about taking my hammock and being unable to find anywhere to hang, especially since I know it gets quite cold at night down there.

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