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  1. #21
    hutzelbein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post
    I'm not familiar enough with the wooki to understand why that matters.
    My Primaloft gold quilts have wings on them so I have to imagine a little creative assembly and you can easily turn the quilt out in a similar manner for a wooki.... the wooki just has bigger wings.
    Maybe I just don't understand the technique. I thought it works similar to sewing a pillow case, only with one more layer. You put the outer side on the outer side, so that the insides are facing out. On top you put the insulation. Then you sew around the edges with a seam allowance. Grab into the pocket between the shell fabric layers and turn the whole thing inside out. The beauty with this is, that the edges end up invisible on the inside. But with the Wooki, one layer is larger than the other layer. This means that the fabric outside the seam will be pulled on the inside. But I need it to stay on the outside.

    Thinking more about it, I suppose I could fold the remaining fabric so that it is in the "pocket" - similar to the channels of a normal underquilt. But this would create an extra fold and I'm not sure how this will increase the stress on seams. The original Wooki is like a hammock with the insulation sewn to the underside. It works so well because the carrier fabric has the exact same shape as the hammock. I guess I need to get some scraps and sew up a small model to see if it could work.

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post
    Often times for me- just understanding that something is going to suck makes it easier to deal with.
    I get that. I didn't expect that working with Climashield isn't as straightforward as it seemed. If it sucks, that's OK. I just wanted to make sure that I wasn't missing something obvious. I know a couple of sewing machine novices have sewn synthetic Wookis; I have to say that after trying my hand at it myself, I admire them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post
    If nothing else- walk away for a while. Sometimes that's the most productive thing you can do.
    Very true. I tried two nights and stopped to sleep on it. Tonight I'll try again and hope that the third time is the charm.

  2. #22
    hutzelbein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leiavoia View Post
    The glue I have used is called Beacon Fabri-Tac. It’s dries completely and clear. It is not gummy. It is washable and permanent. You can sew through it. It sets in 15 minutes and cured in 24 hours. I have used it to bond slippery seems before sewing. It avoids a great deal of frustration.

    There are other types of glue sold by Aleene’s that are designed to be temporary, but I have not tried them. There are also reports of people using regular Elmer’s Glue Stick, but I would be suspicious of that one.
    Thanks, I'll look these glues up. It's worth a try with the next quilt I'm planning to sew.

  3. #23
    Senior Member P-Dub's Avatar
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    I have been thinking about making a Climashield wookie-like UQ as well. What about doing a roll-hem on the smaller piece of nylon, sewing the CS to that bottom piece, then stitching that to the larger (top) piece of the UQ? See some of the photos of SimplyLightDesigns TrailWinder insulated UQP in this thread or here

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by hutzelbein View Post
    Maybe I just don't understand the technique. I thought it works similar to sewing a pillow case, only with one more layer. You put the outer side on the outer side, so that the insides are facing out. On top you put the insulation. Then you sew around the edges with a seam allowance. Grab into the pocket between the shell fabric layers and turn the whole thing inside out. The beauty with this is, that the edges end up invisible on the inside. But with the Wooki, one layer is larger than the other layer. This means that the fabric outside the seam will be pulled on the inside. But I need it to stay on the outside.

    Thinking more about it, I suppose I could fold the remaining fabric so that it is in the "pocket" - similar to the channels of a normal underquilt. But this would create an extra fold and I'm not sure how this will increase the stress on seams. The original Wooki is like a hammock with the insulation sewn to the underside. It works so well because the carrier fabric has the exact same shape as the hammock. I guess I need to get some scraps and sew up a small model to see if it could work.
    Probably just a typo-
    But you want right side to right side (what becomes outside and outside) facing each other and then the insulation stacked on that.
    That way when you turn it the insulation is on the interior and the right sides (finished faces of the fabric) are out. All the seams are neat and hidden- even if they were crappy

    Doing a wooki this way does take some mental gymnastics. Probably more than is needed.
    I could perhaps imagine this working if you didn't sew right to the corners... but the more I think about it I believe you are correct in that you'd introduce a fold in there that could create an issue for you.

    Probably the cleanest thing I can think of is to cut the shell with about 1 1/2" extra on all four sides. (double thickness of insulation)
    Then place the insulation facing the right side of the fabric (outside) and sew the two longer sides right on the edge.
    Sew one short side completely (you'd have a small dart in the center).
    Sew the other short side but leave an opening of at least 12" to turn it.

    You could then turn this pocket inside out which would give you a clean piece of insulation with a shell wrapping around the edges most of the way. The last flap can be folded over and pinned down.

    With this fairly clean insulated piece you can then attach to the hammock shaped shell of the wooki by simply top stitching it.
    Pin the heck out of it. Put pins perpendicular to the stitch every 12" or so and the machine will be less likely to displace the layers.

    You can also sew from each corner towards the center of each side. This will reduce your creep somewhat... or rather if you do get some creep you can treat it like a dart which would improve the loft by giving the outer shell a little relief/slack.

  5. #25

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    Has anyone ever considered old fashioned quilt ties on a climashield quilt? I know it isn’t trendy, but the reason bedspreads have little buttons all over them is to prevent the batting on the inside from drifting while still allowing loft. Basically, you put a heavy yarn through all layers of the fabric and tie it off, repeating at regular intervals to secure the entire blanket. Yarns can be left loose to allow loft as opposed to crushing the layers together.

    https://newquilters.com/how-to-tie-a-quilt/

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by leiavoia View Post
    Has anyone ever considered old fashioned quilt ties on a climashield quilt? I know it isn’t trendy, but the reason bedspreads have little buttons all over them is to prevent the batting on the inside from drifting while still allowing loft. Basically, you put a heavy yarn through all layers of the fabric and tie it off, repeating at regular intervals to secure the entire blanket. Yarns can be left loose to allow loft as opposed to crushing the layers together.

    https://newquilters.com/how-to-tie-a-quilt/
    http://www.rayjardine.com/ray-way/Qu...x.htm?g_page=6

    Ray Jardine does that.
    Ask him- he invented top quilts.
    Ask others... some agree some don't... mainly based on how much the like Ray, lol.
    Ask me... he's perhaps technically correct.

    Technically- if you are using Apex it should be quilted 24" on center.
    But nobody actually does that as far as I am aware of. At best there is a seam at the footbox area but that's rare enough as Apex is cheaper than labor.

  7. #27
    FJRpilot's Avatar
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    Why not just purchase a walking foot attachment for your machine? It was designed to solve this problem...


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men should do nothing.”

    - Edmund Burke

  8. #28
    hutzelbein's Avatar
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    I managed to finish the quilt with a lot of basting. I ended up basting the Climashield on the smaller fabric, and then basting both on the carrier fabric. Sewing wasn't easy, but it worked out somehow. The first seams don't look nice, but I started getting the hang of it. The quilt seems to work, although it has a couple of puckers in some areas.

    For the next quilt, I ordered some non-permanent fabric spray-glue I was recommended by a seamstress who works with insulation. I hope this works better than the techniques I tried so far. It would be great to avoid pinning holes in the quilt fabric.

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post
    Probably the cleanest thing I can think of is to cut the shell with about 1 1/2" extra on all four sides. (double thickness of insulation)
    Then place the insulation facing the right side of the fabric (outside) and sew the two longer sides right on the edge.
    Sew one short side completely (you'd have a small dart in the center).
    Sew the other short side but leave an opening of at least 12" to turn it.

    You could then turn this pocket inside out which would give you a clean piece of insulation with a shell wrapping around the edges most of the way. The last flap can be folded over and pinned down.
    That's a neat idea (if I'm picturing this correctly)! I'll give it a try if the glue doesn't work. Thanks!

  9. #29
    Senior Member Baka Dasai's Avatar
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    I've been thinking of buying a "Wookie-like" Climashield UQ from Simply Light Designs, but then had the bright idea of making one myself.

    And then I had the bright idea of searching Hammock Forums to see if anybody else had done it to see if there were any gotchas.

    Plenty of gotchas here.

  10. #30
    Senior Member BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leiavoia View Post
    Has anyone ever considered old fashioned quilt ties on a climashield quilt? I know it isn’t trendy, but the reason bedspreads have little buttons all over them is to prevent the batting on the inside from drifting while still allowing loft. Basically, you put a heavy yarn through all layers of the fabric and tie it off, repeating at regular intervals to secure the entire blanket. Yarns can be left loose to allow loft as opposed to crushing the layers together.

    https://newquilters.com/how-to-tie-a-quilt/
    Well, I am certainly no expert, not even a novice, at all of this sewing business. I don't even have a machine, so I'm no help for the OP. But this post ( and entire thread) did catch my eye and I am trying to learn from it. I have the original WB UQ, the Climashield version of the Yeti. It allows adding and subtracting layers of CS.

    The first 2.5 oz/sq/yd layer is sewn to the edges of the differential cut shell layer that goes against my back. Over the many years, I have always added layers by- with the quilt turned inside out, laying them on the original layer and then running a long continuous thread through all CS layers around the perimeter. I either leave a little distance between the edges to allow for the curve when in use(so that the outer layers won't get compressed), or I lay the quilt on an ironing board with the edges hanging over the ironong board, so that the curve is already present, before I attach the other layers.

    But recently I have noticed that the weight of the added layers were not being supported adequately by perimeter of the original layer of CS, so I have added a few quilting loops/yarn through the inside shell and all layers of CS, leaving just enough slack in the loop to allow the CS to fully loft, but holding it up and preventing gaps. Then I turn it outside out and have a seriously warm UQ. I don't know if I am doing this right or not, but it does seem to work.

    Inside out UQ on ironing board with 1 layer of CS sewn directly to the inside shell:




    3 additional layers added, draped over ironing board to induce curvature such as during use, connected to original layer along perimeter(but not sewn to shell), then a few quilting loops of yarn passed through inner shell and all layers(not shown), for additional support while allowing full loft.

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