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  1. #11
    hutzelbein's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Germany
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    WBBB SL 1.7
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    WB Mamajamba
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    Quote Originally Posted by SilvrSurfr View Post
    And you pay a lot more for Swiss-Army knife hammocks, loaded with features that I don't want or need: peak bags, ridgeline organizers, gear shelves, overcovers, hammock tie-outs and zippers.
    Funny, the only knife I carry on hikes is a Swiss Army knife. When I bought it, I made sure that it had exactly those tools that I know I (frequently) use. Same goes for my Blackbird. The features might be lost on some people, but I have tried all kinds of hammocks, including several no-net plus bug sock versions, BIAS being one of them, and I keep coming back to my BB. I use all the features and don't consider them unnecessary. I need a bug net - an integrated one saves me weight, and since I would never go without one, the stand-alone feature that a sock provides would be lost on me. I want/need access to quite a bit of stuff at night; some I could store outside my hammock, like my water bottle - but things like my e-reader or my layer-up clothes or my meds I wouldn't want lying on the ground to prevent them from getting dirty/wet/carried away by animals or humans and have them available to me without being fully awake. The shelf is the best solution for me.

    So I simply don't agree with the opinion that "Swiss Army" style is generally a bad idea or inferior to more modular solutions. It depends on what you need and what you want. What you consider an advantage with your set-up, I consider a disadvantage. So know yourself and pick your set-up accordingly. And it never hurts to try a couple of hammocks and own more than one

    And with regards to cost: an integrated hammock costs about the same as a comparable no-net hammock plus bug sock. Depending on the manufacturer one or the other might come out a bit cheaper, but the difference is not that great.

    Quote Originally Posted by SilvrSurfr View Post
    Swiss-Army-knife hammocks also define the way you lay, and if you don't wanna lay that way, then it's time to buy a new hammock.
    Some people only need/want to lay in one direction - so the "feature" to be able to lay both ways is useless for them. I tried lying head left, feet right, and it feels weird. Like writing with the wrong hand. It's just another feature - either you need/want it, or you don't. Pick what suits your needs best.

    Quote Originally Posted by SilvrSurfr View Post
    I've also experienced calf ridge in every hammock I've tried with an integrated bugnet, but have never experienced it in a simple, gathered-end.
    I have had calf ridges in all types of gathered end hammocks - integrated and no-nets. I always found the BB's foot box helpful for avoiding the dreaded ridge.

  2. #12
    Herder of Cats OutandBack's Avatar
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    Dec 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vela A. View Post
    I'm all set to buy a Warbonnet Blackbird. Can't wait! But every now and then I see a $20 hammock an wonder why I'm not just getting one of those and a bug net. I'm sure they aren't a comfortable and amazing. I would appreciate it if you would all tell me this too. Because I'm cheap and I would rather only spend $20. But I want a great hammock for my AT thru hike! So.... why shouldn't I buy a cheap hammock?
    I would not buy anything until you do more research. There is so much more to hammock camping on a thru hike than what hammock to buy.
    If as you say you are cheap....... hammock gear for a thru hike is probably not in your budget.
    Most new to the hammock camping/hiking world don't realize the hammock is only 1/4 of the cost.

    Save you money and keep reading...

  3. #13
    New Member Keep Calm And Hike On's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Fort dix, New jersey
    Hammock
    Hennessy Hammock Explorer Deluxe
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    41
    I have a nice HH deluxe explorer and love it but it's heavy. I recently switched to a grand trunk ultralight hammock which reduced weight and I made a bug net system with build it overcover. And find it nice to have the option to go net less. And even more recent I made a custom 9 foot closed ended hammock which shaved another 4 ozs. I'd rather have less weight than bells and whistles. It's all about shedding weight when you are going to be hiking lots of miles. I find any hammock I've slept in gives me the same great sleep. You UQ and TQ are what makes it a warm comfy sleep more so than the fancy hammock.

    Drop me a pm if you want a lightweight sleep system.

    Ryan
    www.keepcalmandhikeon.com
    Ryan Boyles
    Owner
    Keep Calm And Hike On
    www.KeepCalmAndHikeOn.com

  4. #14
    OneClick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Wasteland that is IN
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    Dutch Argon 10.5'
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    Quote Originally Posted by Womble View Post
    My first reflection would be 'you get what you pay for'.
    At almost 34 years old, I'm still trying to pound this into my head. I'm getting close, but I still deviate now and then

    This is a great example. I love my WBBB. I recently bought a Taveler model to lighten up, but it's just not the same.

    After all, this whole forum is about hammocking; it pays to have a nice, sturdy, comfortable hammock. I'm not saying you can't get that for $20, but it's one of the areas where you may not want to try and get away for cheap.

  5. #15
    SnrMoment's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Falling Rock, MT
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    DIY
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    DIY
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    You will get most of your "investment" back on a cottage vendor hammock, regardless of which one you purchase.
    I'm one of those who hates zippers & tie outs. Learned that through experience and sold them for about what I paid. I've since gone to DIY for hammocks/tarps/bug nets/various forms of covers & accessories.
    It's hard to make a decision - everybody has an opinion based on what works for them. I'd start with what you think will work for you long before I set off on a long hike. A lot easier to change out before you go and a quilt that fits a WBBB will also work as well on a standard 11 ft rig.
    Love is blind. Marriage is an eye opener.

  6. #16
    cougarmeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Hammock
    WBBB, WBRR, WL LiteOwl
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    OES, WL BullFro
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    I'd guess that $20 is a pretty inexpensive lesson cost. Buy that hammock and you will learn soon enough if the cost saving was worth it. If is isn't, you have a spare you can use as a separate camp "chair" or for holding just your gear or carrying on a sunny day hike. Follow the math suggesting in these posts - if you are considering camping then you may need a bug net and because the $20 wonder isn't double layer, you'll need an under quilt or under cover. Be sure to consider not just the cost of a NEW "camping" hammock but the lower cost of good deals that appear in the For Sale forum.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Womble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Geneva, Switzerland
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    DH T'bird / WB RR
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    Quote Originally Posted by SilvrSurfr View Post
    Dutch PolyD 1.4 hammock or a BIAS Hiker Lite for $33.
    Add a suspension to it and you are at $70 or $75 with Papasmurf, but yes these are the kind of examples I was promoting...

  8. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
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    Argon 11'
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    Big Daddy
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    Jarbige + Snivler
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    Speed hooks
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    78
    I'm kind of curious about this, myself. I started with an eno doublenest, because it was on the shelf at REI, and have since gotten a couple 11' $30 dutch hammocks, seeking a flatter lay / lighter weight. Wish I hadn't blown $70 on that Eno - don't know what the extra $40 I spent on it was for. The crinkle taffeta feel is nice, I guess. I'm curious what a fancier hammock would get me. I haven't been bothered by insects when I go out for whatever reason. A footbox might be nice?

  9. #19
    OneClick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Wasteland that is IN
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    I'm going back and forth on my WBBB vs Traveler (simple, no net)

    99% of the time I hike bugs are not a concern, but still want my WBBB becasue:

    - I love the shelf
    - Using just the shelf-side tie out reduces swinging
    - The bug net even in cool weather blocks wind (maybe more with my older WBBB model since it has less mess and more nylon)
    - The foot box isn't necessary to me at 5'9", but makes it easier to get my legs and TQ situated (get in and push against the "wall"). i.e. contains my quilt/jacket/whatever else I may sleep with without it falling out.

  10. #20
    Senior Member dakotaross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Chamblee, GA
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    Bonefire Whisper or no net
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vela A. View Post
    ...I want a great hammock for my AT thru hike! So.... why shouldn't I buy a cheap hammock?
    Um, not this year, right? You were going to try it out first, and not in Feb getting ready for March? Right?

    I have learned over the years that cheap is really more for folks who know what they're looking for. For instance, $20 hammock is likely a short one, and not one that would typically be comfy over the course of many nights on the trail. Many of us are using cheap $20 hammocks - whether we bought them or made them ourselves. Its fine to buy cheap and use and figure stuff out as you go along. I would not want to do that on a thru, though. As it is, if you are going out this year, then you will be learning as you go along. Only real problem with doing that is starting in March/April cold at higher elevation.
    "I wonder if anyone else has an ear so tuned and sharpened as I have, to detect the music, not of the spheres, but of earth, subtleties of major and minor chord that the wind strikes upon the tree branches. Have you ever heard the earth breathe... ?"
    - Kate Chopin

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